How Big Should a Knowledge Guru Game Be?

Customers frequently ask us, “How big should my Knowledge Guru game be?”

We respond back with “It depends.” Game “size” really means the number of topics you include in the game and the amount of content you include in terms of learning objectives, questions (Quest/Legend) or content for each mini-game (Drive.)   The biggest two factors influencing game size are: 1) the way you intend for players to interact with the game, 2)  the number of learning objectives you intend for the game to support.

There are three possible ways you can plan for learners to interact with your game:

  • Play through the entire game in a single session at a time of their choosing.This scenario automatically means you are using a Quest or Legend game type. It should also trigger you to design a shorter game with a maximum of five topics (Quest allows up to 7; Legend allows up to 4). Within each topic plan on four to six question sets per topic.  This will give players about 15 to 30 minutes of game play time and enable you to introduce or reinforce the most essential content.
  • Space play over time. Both Drive and Quest are designed for spaced play. With Quest it is an option. With Drive, it is required. With spaced play, your game can have more content within it because players only see a portion of it at a time. A Drive game controls the interaction, limiting it to about 5 minutes per day so your larger question is how many days do you want them to have to play to see all of your game’s content. With Quest, you can space play two ways: a level per day (1 topic and 1 set of questions associated with that topic) or a world per week (all topics and one set of the questions associated with all those topics).
  • Play a Legend or Quest game as part of a live event. In this scenario, you are going to specify a certain amount of time be spent in game play. This absolutely dictates the amount of content you can include. You cannot have more questions within a topic than someone can reasonably complete in the time you are allocating for game play.

Be very aware that learners read and process information at different speeds. Learners spend widely varying amounts of time to complete the same game. Their processing speed depend on reading proficiency, education level, their native language, and their familiarity with the content. Factor these things into your judgment of how much content to include.

Use the links provided below to get specific guidance by game type.

  • Drive
  • Legend or Quest

Drive

The daily Drive experience is approximately 5 minutes.  A great Drive experience includes sufficient content to give players at least three instances of “retrieval practice” for every learning objective/game you have.

A general guideline is to target seven to nine days of game play. This should allow players to play all the games multiple times. and equates to about 45  minutes spent with the app over a period of two to three weeks’ time with a goal of playing three times per week.

Guidelines specific to each minigame:

Balloon Burst

The minimum number of statements required is three. For an optimal game, provide at least six if you only have two categories or five per category if you have three or more categories.

For additional Balloon Burst best practices, click here.

#Happy

Include three contexts/scenarios within a game to provide ample practice. You can create a #Happy game with only one context/scenario, but to maximize practice, try for three.

Consider going beyond six statements for better re-playability of contexts/scenarios. You can reword a good or bad response to encourage the learner to focus on the feedback and to prevent them from doing well on future play-throughs simply because they memorized responses. Here’s an example of two ways to phrase a response that achieves the same aim.

  • Example: “What safety data have you already seen? (Question) “Here is our safety data.” (Statement)

For additional #Happy best practices, click here.

Knowledge Knight

Games require at least six questions to ensure a minimum of two play-throughs of the game. We recommend creating nine questions. This ensures variety, but keeps the number of playthroughs required for mastery to a reasonable amount.

An ideal series of three questions includes one question that encourages recall of knowledge coupled with two questions that require application of that knowledge in a job context the learner will encounter in the job.

For additional Knowledge Knight best practices, click here.

Safecracker

For an optimal player experience, include at least three needs (aka scenarios), which results in three unique rounds of the game. The maximum number of unique needs is five.

Each time the game is played, it will display two distractors along with the correct responses for each benefit and feature. When you create your game, re-use distractors across benefits and across features to verify that your learners can truly associate correct benefits with needs and correct features with benefits.

For additional Safecracker best practices, click here.

Quest Game Size

Like Drive, Quest is designed to maximize learner retention of content. However, if you overload your game with too much content, you will hurt your players’ ability to remember. Novice authors can go a bit crazy on crafting questions and suddenly find themselves with 8, 9, 10 or even 11 question sets within a single topic. The result is player fatigue and overload. They end up remembering very little.

Quest requires you create a minimum of three topics with a maximum of seven topics. We recommend creating a minimum of three question sets per topic. Consider whether spacing is applied when deciding on the maximum number of questions within a level. Also assume players need 30 to 45 seconds to respond to a question when calculating how long play will take.

Player perspective: If I am playing a level per day, then eight or nine questions doesn’t seem like a big deal. If I play an entire game all at once, then eight or nine questions in a level is too many. In such cases, limit the number of questions within a level to four to six questions and vary the number from level to level.

Legend Game Size

If you truly have lots and lots of content to cover, consider crafting several “mini-games” that can be spaced out. The Legend game type is particularly good for designing this type of solution. You can have a highly effective Legend game that has only three topics with three question sets in each topic.

Legend requires a minimum of one topic if you want (though we don’t recommend it) with a maximum of four topics. Be aware that players need about 30 – 45 seconds to read and respond to a question:

  • A 4-topic game with 12 question sets may take 20 to 30 minutes to play, excluding Grab Bag.
  • A 4-topic game with 28 question sets may take 45 to 65 minutes to play, excluding Grab Bag.

Player perspective: A game “path” that has between 4 to 7 questions feels comfortable; paths with more than nine questions are too long. Vary the number of questions within each topic. Don’t make them identical. (e.g. every topic should not have same number of questions within it.)

How to Create and Edit Topics in Drive

To create a valid Drive game, you need at least three topics in your game. The maximum number of topics we recommend is seven.

Quick Steps to Create Topics

  1. Select Develop from the left-hand navigation pane.
  2. Expand Develop to reveal sub-menu options and select Create or Edit Topics.
  3. When the wizard appears, enter a topic name in the field labeled Add your new topic here.
  4. Click SUBMIT NEW TOPIC.
  5. Your new topic will appear. You can do one of two things: 1) Click GO TO OBJECTIVES to create objectives for that specific topic, or 2) Create another game topic using the New Topic field that has been created for you.

Quick Steps to Edit or Remove Topics

  1. Select Develop from the left-hand navigation pane.
  2. Expand Develop to reveal sub-menu options and select Create or Edit Topics.
  3. To edit a topic, simply change the text for that topic and click SAVE.
  4. To remove a topic, click REMOVE under the topic you want to delete. Removing a topic will also remove any objectives and mini-games associated with it.
  5. If you’re sure you want to proceed, click REMOVE TOPIC.

How to Create and Edit Objectives in Drive Using Bloom’s Taxonomy

Strong objectives make for a strong Drive game experience for players that is relevant to their needs. Drive’s creation wizard tries to help you create specific, measurable objectives designed to use Bloom’s Taxonomy: a classification system that organizes knowledge by complexity.


Want an in-depth overview on how Bloom’s Taxonomy works? We describe how it works for learning games here:


To create an objective, you must first create a game topic. Once you have a topic in place, follow these steps to create an objective:

  1. Expand Develop option from left-hand navigation pane, and select Create or Edit Objectives.
  2. Use the Create or Edit Objectives for Topic drop-down menu to select the topic for which you want to create an objective.
  3. Use the Identify behavior learner will do drop-down menu to specify exactly what behavior you want the learner to demonstrate. This list of verbs describes behaviors associated with Bloom’s Taxonomy of Learning and helps you consider the level of cognitive complexity required to achieve the objective.
  4. Use the Create learning objective field to write the objective.
  5. Click ADD NEW OBJECTIVE.

Click through the slideshow below to see the steps in action.

Here are three examples of behaviors you can choose from and learning objectives that include that behavior in their description.

Behavior Sample learning objective
ask Ask the optimal questions based on knowledge of that customer type.
choose Choose the appropriate benefits and features to highlight based on each specific need.
distinguish Distinguish ACME’s products from those of its top three competitors.

The behavior you choose from the drop-down list affects the mini-games available for you to develop as each mini-game is associated with specific behaviors on Bloom’s Taxonomy. Here are the behaviors each mini-game support:

Mini-Game Bloom’s Levels Targeted Verb Choices Associated with Mini-Game
Balloon Burst Knowledge and Comprehension compare, contrast, distinguish, identify, match, select

 

#Happy Comprehension and Application choose, demonstrate, use

 

Knowledge Knight Application, Analysis, Synthesis, Evaluation analyze, categorize, choose, combine, compare, conclude, critique, decide, demonstrate, determine, distinguish, estimate, evaluate, identify, infer, justify, organize, prioritize, respond, solve, use
Safecracker Application, Analysis, Synthesis, Evaluation build, categorize, choose, classify, develop, identify, match, provide, select

How to Create and Edit Mini-Games

Version 1.0 of Drive has four mini-games available to you with more mini-games available in future releases. Key things to know or do before authoring a single mini-game:

  • Each of the four mini-games has unique content requirements that will align with the learning objective you created. Consequently, each wizard provides you with different prompts to follow and fields to complete.
  • Before you can create a mini-game, you need to define a topic and a learning objective associated with that topic.
  • A mini-game can only be associated with a single learning objective. If your topic requires more than one learning objective, you must create a mini-game for EACH learning objective within the topic.
  • Play each mini-game before authoring a Drive game experience. Doing so ensures you understand the player experience and the kind of content you will see within a particular type of mini-game.
  • As you create your game, use the Preview Mini Game functionality within each mini-game authoring wizard to check out your game and verify that it works and looks as you envisioned it would. Do not make your Drive game experience live without previewing all the games you have created.

Creating a New Mini-Game

Assuming you have created a topic and a learning objective, here’s the process for creating a mini-game:

  1. Select Develop from the left-hand navigation pane, expanding this option to reveal sub-menu choices.
  2. Select Create or Edit Mini Games.
  3. Review the topic and objectives listed on the screen. Click CREATE next to the one for which you want to create a mini-game. A screen labeled Choose Mini Game will appear.
  4. The mini-games available will be highlighted. The choices available depend on the behavior you specified within your learning objective.
  5. From the mini-games available to you, click the one you want. This action opens the wizard for that mini-game.
  6. Proceed to input content, using the wizard associated with the mini-game you selected.

FAQs – Game Creation

  • I chose a mini-game and then realized it wasn’t the one I wanted. How do I change it?
    • Go back to Develop in left-hand navigation, expand it, and then select Create or Edit Mini Games. Choose REMOVE next to the topic/objective combination whose mini-game you want to delete. You will be asked to confirm your decision. Once you do so, you will once again see CREATE. You can then proceed through the process of selecting another mini-game.
  • I only have one mini-game available to me based on the behavior I specified in the objective, and it is not the one I wanted. What do I do?
  • I entered content, but it disappeared. What happened?
    • Because of the logic required within the mini-games, one content entry must be saved before you move to a new field. Failure to use the SAVE button next to each field where one appears is the typical cause of content seeming to get “lost” or failing to be retained. Watch carefully for SAVE buttons and click them wherever you see them to avoid losing content you create.

Edit an Existing Mini-Game

  1. Expand Develop option within left-hand navigation pane, and select Create or Edit Mini Games.
  2. Find the topic, objective, and corresponding mini-game you want to edit.
  3. Click EDIT (listed under Actions column on the screen).
  4. Within the wizard, enter your desired changes, being sure to click SAVE wherever a SAVE button is provided. Failing to do so may result in loss of content changes as many of the fields in the authoring wizards require a SAVE action after each entry.

Remove a Mini-Game

  1. Expand Develop option within left-hand navigation pane, and select Create or Edit Mini Games.
  2. Find the topic, objective, and corresponding mini-game you want to remove.
  3. Under Actions, click REMOVE. Be aware that selecting this option removes all content associated with the mini game.

Understanding Mini-Game Options that are Part of Drive

Version 1.0 of Knowledge Guru Drive includes four different mini-games: Balloon Burst, #Happy, Knowledge Knight and Safecracker. Depending on the content of the questions you create, each mini-game can target certain levels of Bloom’s Taxonomy. The six levels are knowledge, comprehension, application, analysis, synthesis, and evaluation.


Want an in-depth overview on how Bloom’s Taxonomy works? We describe how it works for learning games here:


The mini-games you can use will depend on the objectives you create for your topics and where those objectives are classified according to Bloom’s Taxonomy of learning. Please see this blog post for an explanation of creating objectives and the mini-games associated with the different levels of Bloom’s Taxonomy.

The table below summarizes each mini-game.

Game Name Game Goal Game Rules Supported Bloom’s Taxonomy Levels Example Learning Objectives
Balloon Burst

bb

Burst the balloon by correctly responding to statements provided. Each correct response inflates the balloon. Delayed responses or incorrect responses deflate the balloon. A game must include minimum of 2 categories and maximum of 6.

A category must include minimum of 3 statements (we recommend at least 5) and maximum of 20.

Correct responses inflate the balloon.

Incorrect responses deflate the balloon.

Levels 1 and 2 Given a feature, associate the feature with the correct product.

Given a variety of features, compare COMPANY product to its competitors.

Given specific situations and your knowledge of policies, procedures, or guidelines, determine whether to act or not to act.

#Happy

happy

Grow happiness in the person you are responding to. This person will always be one specific role (customer, supplier, employee). Once you hit PLAY, you get a “context” that explains an issue, situation, or background on the person you need to make happy.

You then see a statement from the target person you are trying to make happy, along with a panel of six responses. You swipe between panels to see all the responses.

You review each response and decide whether each response is a good one or a poor one to make. If your respond correctly, you grow happiness. If you respond incorrectly, happiness declines.

If the response is a bad one, tapping it causes you to lose a life (e.g. an unhappy face fills in). You see an explanation of why the choice is a bad one.

If you tap a response you shouldn’t, you lose the game. Two inappropriate taps cause you to lose the game.

Level 3 Given a variety of contexts and customer inquiries or statements, choose appropriate responses to make.

Given a specific context and employee inquires or statements, choose appropriate responses to make.

Given a specific customer objection, choose the appropriate response(s) to make.

Knowledge Knight

kk

Scare away the dragon. Each instance of the game consists of three unique questions that allow for multiple-choice, T/F, select all that apply, or answer in order responses.

Correct responses earn players an item that helps empower the knight. Incorrect responses produce items that are not useful.

If players miss two questions, they lose the game. (The dragon frightens the knight away).

 

Levels 3-6 Given background information, identify the appropriate next step in the XYZ process to take.

Explain the XYZ process.

Given data, analyze the data and form a conclusion.

Given a specific customer objection, choose the appropriate response.

Safecracker

safe

Unlock the safe before the alarm sounds. Players must choose specific items (benefits) that link to the prompt (aka “need statement”) then link those choices to another set of items (features).

Each decision turns the safe dial and enables player to proceed to next decision.

After decisions are made, the player attempts to open safe.

If all decisions are correct, the safe opens and reveals an appropriate sales message to deliver to customer.

If one or more decisions are incorrect, the player must attempt to correct errors. Correct choices remain locked in when player goes back; only incorrect choices will be flagged.

Player then gets a second attempt to crack the safe. If this attempt fails, the players loses, but will see a summary of the need, appropriate benefits, and correct features.

Levels 3-6 Given a specific customer need, choose the appropriate benefits and associated features to present to the customer.

 

For a more detailed description of each mini-game and how to create them, see the articles below:

How to Create and Edit Mini-Games

Guidelines for Creating Balloon Burst

Guidelines for Creating #Happy

Guidelines for Creating Knowledge Knight

Guidelines for Creating Safecracker

Guidelines for Creating Balloon Burst

Balloon Burst enables learners to compare one fixed item or category to up to five other items or categories in some fashion. Balloon Burst is a great game for comparing your product to competitor products.

  • Example: You have Product A and you want to compare it to Products B and C. In every game, the player will always compare Product A to either Product B or Product C. Players will not compare B to C.

For you to use Balloon Burst, you must have created a learning objective that includes a behavior where Balloon Burst is a mini-game option. Use of these verbs within your learning objective means Balloon Burst will be available to you as a mini game option:

  • Compare
  • Contrast
  • Distinguish
  • Identify
  • Match
  • Select

Here’s how to create a game.

Steps to Create a Balloon Burst Game

(NOTE: These steps assume you have already created a game topic and an associated learning objective.)

  1. Expand Develop option within left-hand navigation pane, and select the Create or Edit Mini Games.
  2. Find a topic that uses Balloon Burst as its mini-game and click EDIT.
  3. In the Provide a context section, type a description or context for what your learners will be doing. (For example: Compare Product A to Product B.)
  4. Click SAVE. NOTE: It is critical that you click SAVE whenever you see a SAVE button. You will lose content if you proceed without saving it.
  5. In the field labeled Provide a fixed category and comparator categories, enter a Fixed Category and click SAVE. This is what you’re comparing to all other categories. (For example, your fixed category might be your product. Comparator categories might be the names of your competitors’ products.)
  6. Enter a Comparator Category and click SAVE.
  7. To add another Comparator Category, click ADD NEW COMPETITOR CATEGORY.
  8. Once you’ve added all your competitor categories, click CONTINUE TO GAME STATEMENTS.
  9. Provide statements for your Fixed Category by typing in true statements that are unique to your Fixed Category where it says Placeholder Statement. You do not want any of the statements to apply to anything other than the Fixed Category.
  10. After you enter each statement, click the SAVE button next to it.
  11. To add additional statements, click ADD NEW STATEMENT.
  12. Repeat steps 9-11 for each of your Comparator Categories. The same requirement for your content applies here: the content you include must be unique to the category for which you are creating it.
  13. When you finish adding content, preview what your game by clicking PREVIEW GAME at the bottom left of your screen.

Click through the slideshow below to see the steps in action.

Best Practices

The best games will have sufficient unique content to create multiple play-throughs that let players see some new content on each play-through. Optimally, each category should have at least five statements associated with it so repeat game play ensures players see a mix of statements each time and not the exact same ones repeatedly.

Guidelines for Creating #Happy

#Happy is a great game for helping sales reps practice choosing appropriate responses to customer questions that are based on their specific needs OR responding to objections they make. In either type of practice scenario, you will define who the customer is and provide the learner with a specific context.

In a single daily play of a #Happy game, learners will receive one context/scenario to resolve and review six possible responses they can make to that scenario. If you have created multiple contexts/scenarios in your game, then learners will need to play through #Happy three times to see all three scenarios. If you included lots of responses for each scenario, then there will be multiple play-throughs to expose them to all possible response options for every context/scenario you have.

For you to use #Happy, you must have created a learning objective that includes a behavior where #Happy is a mini-game option. Use of these verbs within your learning objective means #Happy will be available to you as a mini-game option:

  • Choose
  • Demonstrate
  • Use

Here’s how to create a game.

Steps to Create a #Happy Game

(NOTE: These steps assume you have already created a game topic and an associated learning objective.)

  1. Expand Develop option within left-hand navigation pane, and select Create or Edit Mini Games.
  2. Select the topic and learning objective for which you want to create a #Happy mini-game and click CREATE to launch the #Happy game creation wizard.
  3. In the field labeled Who do you want to make happy?, enter a brief one or two-word description of who the learner needs to influence or make happy.
    Examples: doctors, neurologists, GI specialists, crop dusters, pharmacy directors, hospital administrators, distributors, customers, suppliers, employees, etc.
  4. Click SAVE. You must click SAVE after each step to avoid losing data when you leave this screen. Clicking SAVE elsewhere on the screen does not save data entered into this field.
  5. In the field labeled Statement Set 1, enter a specific context or scenario.
    Example: You are meeting with Dr. Jones, a GI specialist. You want to introduce him to bioequivalent biologics as a new therapy option for Crohn’s and IBS that can reduce patient costs for therapy while delivering the same therapeutic benefits as brand biologics.
  6. Click SAVE. (Remember – if you fail to click the appropriate SAVE button, your data will be lost when you leave this screen.)
  7. Enter a Starting Statement that provides learners with a prompt that will guide their decision-making in the game.
    Example: Data on bioequivalency is limited. Your pricing isn’t significantly less than other brands. Why should I consider it?
  8. Click SAVE.
  9. Beneath the heading Good Responses, enter six appropriate responses a learner could make to the Starting Statement. Responses can be in the form of questions or statements.
  10. For each appropriate response, use the fields beneath the Feedback heading to enter an explanation of why each response is a good one.
  11. When all good responses and feedback are entered, click SAVE.
  12. Beneath the heading Bad Responses, enter six inappropriate responses for how players should not respond to the Starting Statement.
  13. For each bad response, use the fields beneath the Feedback heading to enter an explanation of why each response is a bad one.
  14. Click SAVE.
  15. If you want more than the six statements that are the required minimum for the game, click ADD NEW STATEMENT SET at the bottom right of your screen.
  16. When you finish adding content, preview your game by clicking PREVIEW GAME at the bottom right of your screen.

Click through the slideshow below to see the steps in action.

Best Practices

  1. Provide appropriate specificity on the type of person you want players to practice interacting with. (Entered via the Who do you want to make happy field). For example, if a sales rep is selling to GI Specialists, say that as opposed to saying “customers” or “doctors.”
  2. Make sure your context/scenario mirrors the real-world context they have to deal with in their jobs and that it provides cues they need, such as the selling stage they are in or pointers about the status of the relationship with the person they are attempting to influence.
  3. Provide a concise, realistic starting statement.
  4. Include three contexts/scenarios within a game to provide ample practice. You can create a #Happy game with only one context/scenario, but to maximize practice, try for three.
  5. Include some “teach” in your feedback to the good and bad responses. Explain why each one is good or bad.
  6. Consider going beyond six statements for better re-playability of contexts/scenarios. You can re-word a good or bad response to encourage the learner to focus on the feedback and to prevent them from doing well on future play-throughs because they simply memorized responses. Here’s an example of two ways to phrase a response that achieves the same aim.
  • Example: “What safety data have you already seen? (Question) “Here is our safety data.” (Statement)

Guidelines for Creating Knowledge Knight

Knowledge Knight supports the broadest array of learning objectives within Drive. Its quiz-style format ensures easy play for your learners, but given the kind of content you can incorporate, you can make it as challenging as you need to. Knowledge Knight’s authoring tool lets you create a variety of multiple-choice style questions including true/false, select all that apply, fill-in-the-blank and ranking. You can incorporate images, video, or resources into a question.

Each daily play of Knowledge Knight will present learners with three questions to answer, making it quick to play and easy to do. The number of times a player will play a single Knowledge Knight game to fully master it, depends on the total number of questions you include in your game – and how well they perform on the questions.

Use of these verbs within your learning objective means Knowledge Knight will be available to you as a mini-game option:

analyze, categorize, choose, combine, compare, conclude, critique, decide, demonstrate, determine, distinguish, estimate, evaluate, identify, infer, justify, organize, prioritize, respond, rank, solve, use

Here’s how to create a game.

Steps to Create a Knowledge Knight Game

(NOTE: These steps assume you have already created a game topic and an associated learning objective.)

  1. Expand Develop option within left-hand navigation pane, and select Create or Edit Mini Games.
  2. Select the topic and learning objective for which you want to create a Knowledge Knight mini-game and click CREATE to launch the Knowledge Knight game creation wizard.
  3. Under Question 1, select your question type from the Question Type drop down menu on the right. (Multiple choice is the default type.)
  4. Enter your question or statement in the Question Stem field. Use the other fields to enter a correct response and distractor responses. In the case of an “Answer in order” question type, enter the ranking order.
  5. Enter positive feedback for correct responses in the Correct Feedback field.
  6. Enter negative feedback for incorrect responses in the Distractor Feedback field.
  7. If you want to include media, select which type (image, video, or URL) you want to include and either upload an image or copy and paste the URL for your video or web resource.
  8. Click SAVE. If you fail to click SAVE and leave this screen, you will lose your data.
  9. Repeat steps 3-8 for each question you include.
  10. For a game to be complete, you must create six questions, but you can have more. To add additional questions, click ADD NEW QUESTION at the bottom right of your screen.
  11. When you finish adding content, preview your game by clicking PREVIEW GAME at the bottom right of your screen.

Click through the slideshow below to see the steps in action.

Best Practices

Games require at least six questions. This ensures a minimum of two play-throughs of the game. We recommend creating nine questions. This ensures variety, but keeps the number of play-throughs required for mastery to a reasonable amount.

An ideal series of three questions includes one question that encourages recall of knowledge coupled with two questions that require application of that knowledge in a job context the learner will encounter in the job.

True/False questions tend to be the easiest to answer so limit your use of them.

Guidelines for Creating Safecracker

Safecracker is useful any time you need to link things across three categories. Its intended use is to give sales reps practice in formulating sales messages that link benefits and associated features to specific customer needs. It is the most specific Drive game available.

If you want to create a Safecracker game, use these verbs as part of your learning objective:

build, categorize, choose, classify, develop, identify, match, provide, select

Here’s how to create a game.

Steps to Create a Safe Cracker Game

(NOTE: These steps assume you have already created a game topic and an associated learning objective.)

  1. Expand Develop option within left-hand navigation pane, and select Create or Edit Mini Games.
  2. Select the topic and learning objective for which you want to create a Safecracker mini-game and click CREATE to launch the Safecracker game creation wizard.
  3. In the field labeled Need 1, enter your customer need. Here’s an example for our product Drive:
    I need to engage my learners and make training stand out; I need something different.
  4. Enter the sales message that a learner ideally would make to a customer in responding to the need in the field labeled Sales message for this need.
  5. Click SAVE. (As with all Drive games, failing to click SAVE next to a field or fields associated with the SAVE button results in loss of data if you leave the screen you are on.)
  6. Click CONTINUE TO BENEFITS.
  7. Enter a benefit that corresponds to Need 1 under Correct Benefit 1-1-1.
  8. Enter four distractor benefits under Distractor Benefits 1-1-1.
  9. Click SAVE.
  10. Click CONTINUE TO FEATURES under Benefit Set 1-1-1.
  11. Enter the correct feature that corresponds to Benefit 1-1-1 under Correct Feature 1-1-1.
  12. Enter four distractor features you want to include under Distractor Features 1-1-1.
  13. Click SAVE.
  14. If there are additional features associated with the benefit, click ADD ANOTHER FEATURE at the bottom of the screen. Each benefit can have up to four features associated with it.
  15. If there is more than one benefit that should be cited in response to Need 1, click BACK TO BENEFITS and then click ADD ANOTHER BENEFIT and repeat Steps 7 through 13. You can associate a maximum of four benefits with a customer need.
  16. To repeat entire process for a second customer need, click BACK TO NEEDS and repeat steps 3-15 for each need you want include.

Click through the slideshow below to see the steps in action.

 Best Practices

The customer needs you include in Safecracker should come straight from the selling materials you have provided to sales reps. This is not the game to introduce completely new customer needs to sales reps. This is reinforcement practice and not training.

For optimal player experience, include at least three needs (aka scenarios), which results in three unique rounds of the game. The maximum number of unique needs is five.

On any play of the game, the game will display two distractors along with the correct response for each benefit and feature. When you create your game, re-use distractors across benefits and across features to verify that your learners can truly associate correct benefits with needs and correct features with benefits.