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gblpicks

GBL Picks: Being an Advocate for Games, 7 Great Games, and Games for Social/Emotional Learning

gblpicks

The Knowledge Guru team is obviously very interested in the future of game based learning, and right now that future is bright. But not everyone is as informed about the industry. We are setting out to change that. We’re on a mission to educate the Instructional Design community and the decision makers in Training and Development about game based learning and its true potential.

As part of that mission we’re bringing you GBL picks, a series of curated resources on game based learning and gamification. We’ll explain why each resource is important and how the information in them can be used to shape opinions on game based learning. So now, without further ado, here are this week’s GBL picks:

Pick #1

5 Simple Things Educators Can Do To Promote GBL

This week’s GBL Picks has a few articles focused on educators in a school setting, but the ideas still translate perfectly into the corporate word. In this first article, the author highlights five ways to promote game-based learning. Games need advocates in the learning realm because there will always be people who think games are frivolous—and that’s where you come in. You should be out there joining forums, playing games, and being an advocate. A great suggestion in this list is to start small. If GBL is a completely new thing for your organization, then try running a small pilot program. This will get the ball rolling in the right direction for more creative and engaging learning.

Pick #2

7 Great Educational Apps And Games

This slideshow made it on the list mostly because of Step 1 in Sharon Boller’s Learning Game Design Series: Play and Evaluate Games. Any of you reading GBL Picks should be playing a lot of different games all the time. This is a list put together by Forbes contributing editor Jordan Shapiro who frequently writes about game based learning, so I think it’s a good place to start. Download a few of these games and gamified apps and poke around. See if you learn something about how you want to build your learning game.

Pick #3

Video Games and Social Emotional Learning

Our last article takes a very in-depth look at games as they relate to social and emotional learning. Video games are great at teaching players to healthily manage emotions, self-motivate, understand themselves, and (the part you’re probably most interested in) solve problems. Games like Portal 2 keep the mind sharp and alert through hours of unique, mind-bending puzzle solving. This game emphasizes the importance of navigating a new environment carefully and recognizing and utilizing the materials available in a game. I’m sure you can already see the potential for soft-skills training. Check out the article, it has a lot of research and cites some good sources—a good way to wrap up this weeks GBL Picks.

gblpicks

GBL Picks: Curated Game Based Learning Resources

gblpicks

The Knowledge Guru team is obviously very interested in the future of game based learning, and right now that future is bright. But not everyone is as informed about the industry. We are setting out to change that. We’re on a mission to educate the Instructional Design community and the decision makers in Training and Development about game based learning and its true potential.

As part of that mission we’re bringing you GBL picks, a series of curated resources on game based learning and gamification. We’ll explain why each resource is important and how the information in them can be used to shape opinions on game based learning. So now, without further ado, here are this week’s GBL picks:

Pick #1

Jesse Schell On Serious Games @ Serious Play 2013

Serious Play 2013 was quite an exciting conference for game based learning. Jesse Schell not only delivered the pre-conference workshop talk and the keynote address, but he also won a gold medal for his work on Play Forward: Elm City Stories. That makes him pretty authoritative in the game based learning world, and that’s why this is a great resource. Here you’ll find Jess Schell’s SlideShare presentations from the 2013 Serious Play Conference. There is some great information for anyone interested in serious games and game based learning.

Pick #2

Strategic Ways to Develop Game-Based Learning for High ROI

Our next resource is about getting the most bang for your buck when it comes to gamification and game based learning. This article focuses on one central concept: “Games built with reusability and scalability in mind can be customized and repurposed across the organization at a fraction of the cost of building games from scratch.” The article simply highlights a few of the points Sharon Boller stresses at her Play to Learn Workshop. The Knowledge Guru is a great example of a game that is reusable and scalable across your organization. And as you’ll see in the article, that is the secret to a great return on investment.

Pick #3

Video Games Becoming Required Coursework In Schools

For the final pick, I always like to include articles that demonstrate the attitude shift that’s happening right now in the world of games. This article from Huffington Post talks about how video games, once considered entertainment, are increasingly becoming part of required coursework at all levels of education. I like stressing articles like this one in GBL Picks because if all levels of education are starting to use games to teach students, then the businesses that hire those students are going to really have games in their training. It’s evidence of an attitude shift. Games are the future of engaging learning solutions, whether it’s education or corporate training and development.

gblpicks

GBL Picks: Curated Game Based Learning Resources

gblpicks

The Knowledge Guru team is obviously very interested in the future of game based learning, and right now that future is bright. But not everyone is as informed about the industry. We are setting out to change that. We’re on a mission to educate the Instructional Design community and the decision makers in Training and Development about game based learning and its true potential.

As part of that mission we’re bringing you GBL picks, a series of curated resources on game based learning and gamification. We’ll explain why each resource is important and how the information in them can be used to shape opinions on game based learning. So now, without further ado, here are this week’s GBL picks:

Pick #1

With a mobile boom, learning games are a $1.5B market headed toward $2.3B by 2017

We’ll start this GBL Picks off with some good news, Ambient Insight predicts the Serious Games market, which Ambient calls game-based learning, will grow from $1.5 billion in 2012 to $2.3 billion in 2017. The larger simulation-based learning market, which includes corporate training games, is expected to grow even more from $2.3 billion in 2012 to $6.6 billion in 2017. That’s significant for anyone who reads this blog because it’s more proof of the attitude shift that’s happening in the corporate world. No longer are we seeing higher-ups dismiss games as frivolous. Larger and larger companies are beginning to adopt game based learning. This is promising research for anyone on the fence about adopting their own game based learning solutions.

Pick #2

eLearning Guild Research: Got Game?

Next we’ll move on to some detailed research on games conducted by eLearning Guild. It highlights some examples of really effective gamification that is already being implemented. For example, Adobe has launched LevelUp, a free plugin that applies gamification to learning Photoshop. LevelUp lets new users go on a series of missions, such as reducing redeye and removing unwanted elements from their pictures. As the new users successfully complete each mission, they earn points and badges. You can see for yourself just what this looks like in the article. Another great example provided in the article is Hideki Narematsu, the human resources manager for McDonald’s in Japan, who uses games to train new hires and he says it cuts new-hire training time in half.

Pick #3

Dopamine and games – Liking, learning, or wanting to play?

Finally, our last article is an in-depth (very long) piece that analyses some of the chemical reactions in our brain as we play games, and differentiates between liking, learning, and wanting to play. It’s a great read for anyone who likes science, but for most of you the primary focus will be on the section titled “What does this mean for games?”. In it, the author breaks down some conclusions that could be made from these scientific experiments, like “Rewards that are unpredictable (loot drops) are generally more motivating than rewards that are predictable (100 xp per monster).” So it’s definitely worth at least skimming for anyone who’s interested in using games for learning.

gblpicks

GBL Picks: Curated Game Based Learning Resources

gblpicks

The Knowledge Guru team is obviously very interested in the future of game based learning, and right now that future is bright. But not everyone is as informed about the industry. We are setting out to change that. We’re on a mission to educate the Instructional Design community and the decision makers in Training and Development about game based learning and its true potential.

As part of that mission we’re bringing you GBL picks, a series of curated resources on game based learning and gamification. We’ll explain why each resource is important and how the information in them can be used to shape opinions on game based learning. So now, without further ado, here are this week’s GBL picks:

Pick #1:

A New Perspective on the Bartle Player Types for Gamification

This is a great post because it briefly introduces Dr. Richard Bartle’s model for player types, and then expands upon it, addressing the different types of player from a motivation perspective. His detailed model included 8 types; Griefer, Networker, Politician, Friend, Opportunist, Scientist, Planner and Hacker. From that, the article breaks players into two categories of motivation—intrinsic and extrinsic—and modifies the player types to describe the root of the player’s motivation. Intrinsically motivated user types are: Socialisers, Free Spirits, Achievers, and Philanthropists. Extrinsically motivated user types are: Networkers, Exploiters, Consumers, and Self Seekers. Dive into the full article to see how that all fits together.

Pick #2:

Cognitive Flow: The Psychology of Great Game Design

Cognitive Flow is a psychological concept that describes a heightened level of engagement, a ‘flow’ that you become mentally immerse in. This article introduces you to cognitive flow and shows you four characteristics of tasks that promote it. This is a great article for anyone looking to design learning games because one of the key advantages of games, the reason they are being so widely adopted in training, is engagement. Cognitive flow is something you should definitely stove to achieve with your learning game.

Pick #3:

It Only Takes About 42 Minutes To Learn Algebra With Video Games

This is a great article from Forbes editor Jordan Shapiro (who writes extensively on games for learning) that lays out some hard data gathered from the Washington State Algebra Challenge for K-12 students. As with previous GBL Picks, this article may be about students, but the data it provides is essential for making games a part of the learning culture even at the corporate level. In this challenge, it took an average 41 minutes and 44 seconds for students to master Algebra skills with the DrangonBox app. “Of those students who played at least 1.5 hours, 92.9% achieved mastery. Of those students who played at least 1 hour, 83.8% achieved mastery. Of those students who played at least 45 minutes, 73.4% achieved mastery.” These are amazing results, and the reinforce the fact that games can and do teach.

gblpicks

GBL Picks: Curated Game Based Learning Resources

gblpicks

The Knowledge Guru team is obviously very interested in the future of game based learning, and right now that future is bright. But not everyone is as informed about the industry. We are setting out to change that. We’re on a mission to educate the Instructional Design community and the decision makers in Training and Development about game based learning and its true potential.

As part of that mission we’re bringing you GBL picks, a series of curated resources on game based learning and gamification. We’ll explain why each resource is important and how the information in them can be used to shape opinions on game based learning. So now, without further ado, here are this week’s GBL picks:

Pick #1

Gamification: A Short History

Our first article is a great overview of the history of gamification. The incorporation of game elements into things other than games is not as new as you might think. In this “anthropology of an idea” you can see how gamification evolved from using fun on the factory floor to full blown training games complete with points and badges. This is a great resource for broadening our understanding of games in non-game environments, by seeing how it had evolved we can start to understand the ‘why’ of gamification and help move it even further into the future.

Pick #2

6 Tips for Implementing Gamification

“Gamification can lead to positive businesses outcomes such as innovation, employee performance management and customer engagement. But it can also fail, or even worse, backfire.” That’s why this next resource is on our GBL Picks. These six tips help you avoid costly errors that could cause your gamification efforts to fall flat. The the two most common mistakes made by people trying to implement games are: “it’s a game, how hard could it be to make?” and the immediate assumption that “it’s fun, of course everyone will want to play.” Yes, games are innovative and fun, but they do require work on the trainer’s part. Building the game is a challenge and requires a certain level of knowledge about game design, and you may need to market the game to employees (or make even make contests) to get them to want to play—it’s kind of hard to make ‘fun’ mandatory, so just try to make it happen naturally.

Pick #3

Jane McGonigal: Truths & Myths in Gaming

For our last pick we have something new—a video. This is a YouTube video from the Big Think channel in which a thought leader on games breaks down her view of certain myths our culture has about gaming (and what the actual truths may be). Games are sometimes blamed for a lot of problems in our society, especially pertaining to youths, but McGonigal thinks they’re actually making people better. This is a great resource for understanding the gaming culture—a necessary step towards integrating games in your environment.

gblpicks

GBL Picks: Curated Game Based Learning Resources

gblpicks

The Knowledge Guru team is obviously very interested in the future of game based learning, and right now that future is bright. But not everyone is as informed about the industry. We are setting out to change that. We’re on a mission to educate the Instructional Design community and the decision makers in Training and Development about game based learning and its true potential.

As part of that mission we’re bringing you GBL picks, a series of curated resources on game based learning and gamification. We’ll explain why each resource is important and how the information in them can be used to shape opinions on game based learning. So now, without further ado, here are this week’s GBL picks:

Pick #1

Gaming in the Classroom

Corporate and government environments are obviously very different from K-12 schooling, but for our first pick we think we should take a trip to the classroom. This article highlights that games are becoming more and more popular with teachers—in fact, they’re starting to become the norm. That’s a really significant change for overall learning culture. It’s validating to see teachers embracing game based learning; as people in corporate and government sectors look for more effective ways to train, suddenly games become a serious option.

Pick #2

Gamification Market to be Worth $5.5 Billion by 2018

We always love good market research. The financial sector is always worth paying attention to, because let’s face it, money talks. That’s what makes this particular article so important. It highlights a very important report conducted by global research company Markets and Markets. The report predicts that the gamification will grow from it’s current $421 million market to a $5.5 billion (with a B) market by 2018. This research is so important because it shows that gamification is more than just a buzzword—it’s here to stay. In fact, a separate market research company called M2Research came up with a similar report predicting the gamification market will be worth 2.8 billion by 2016. More great research to substantiate the business of gamification.

Pick #3

Blitz Brainstorming Gamification Tool Fosters Organizational Creativity and Innovation

In this article, Gamification Corp. (one of the thought leaders in the gamification industry) shows off a new gamified solution to the demand for organization creativity. The tool is called Blitz, and it was created by Dr. Ken Hudson, former marketing director of American Express, as a fast, easy way to bring people out of a production rut. The opening line of this article really says it all: “If creativity is a muscle, then gamification is the bench press.” This is a great resource for showing that games can tackle qualitative skills, not just quantitative ones. “The gamification principles strengthening Blitz stem from the basis that time-constrained thinking sessions provide a game with minimal rule-based stipulations but plenty of play.” The article is definitely worth a read, and you may even decide to go check out Blitz yourself.

gblpicks

GBL Picks: Curated Game Based Learning Resources

gblpicks

The Knowledge Guru team is obviously very interested in the future of game based learning, and right now that future is bright. But not everyone is as informed about the industry. We are setting out to change that. We’re on a mission to educate the Instructional Design community and the decision makers in Training and Development about game based learning and its true potential.

As part of that mission we’re bringing you GBL picks, a series of curated resources on game based learning and gamification. We’ll explain why each resource is important and how the information in them can be used to shape opinions on game based learning. So now, without further ado, here are this week’s GBL picks:

Pick #1

How to Invest in Game Based Learning

I love finding articles about game based learning and gamification in Forbes Magazine because I know they’ll be paying attention to the money angle, and for some people that’s the only angle that will get their attention. In this article, contributor Jordan Shapiro writes about how “the game-based learning space, which is still in the formative stages of technological evolution, is clearly a sector fertile for investing.” It’s a great overview of how game based learning has come a long way and has shed the stigma around it. Plus it references some other great material and provides links to some cool reports and reviews.

Pick #2

The Game Changer: Gaming in Healthcare

I was initially hooked by this article when they started talking about Zombie Run!, an app designed to gamify your running. It’s an awesome way to use games in your every day life to motivate you to get (or stay) in shape. You should really check it out. Overall this is a great article about the benefits of games versus traditional methods, not to mention the subject matter being focused on is pharmacy and healthcare which is booming for the Instructional Design community as a whole right now. However, here’s the quote that landed this article in the GBL picks: “What really sparked my interest in the potential of gaming is that a lot of what we do in pharma is around educating and teaching people; whether that’s teaching doctors about specific products, educating the general public and patients about diseases and healthy ways to live, or teaching people how to take their medication.” It’s a great case for games.

Pick #3

Games: More than Just Reward Systems

For the final GBL Pick in today’s post I’m including a reality check—just read the title of the article. Game based learning and gamification are buzzwords right now, and that can be a bad thing. As some people in training and development rush to be on the cutting edge and incorporate this new thing they read about in a magazine, they end up going about it without any real understanding. You will encounter a scenario where someone slapped points and badges on their ordinary training system and call it game based learning. My favorite line from this article is, “Yes, salsa is integral to many Mexican dishes; no, pouring salsa on penne does not make it a Mexican dish.” Plus there’s a video clip at the end of the article where you can hear a panel of people with impressive resumes talk about emerging technologies in education and learning.